September 2, 2014
How to Drink Responsibly | Sierra Club

Helping the planet, pint by pint. While I don’t necessarily agree with the requirement to refrain from using GMO ingredients, some of the other criteria are spot on. (Click on the headline to go to the article. Or, if you are in Eugene, OR, just go to Ninkasi)

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Filed under: beer 
September 1, 2014

The apple harvest is on. That means pie… and CIDER! Listen to a great interview from last fall with Wisconsin’s great apple historian, Dan Bussey. 

(Image from Peterlarson.org)

August 31, 2014
professor: *makes claim about a certain category of decrees from ancient Greece*
me: that's so probouleumatic
Off topic but: As in probouleutos? Oooh, these guys are GOOD!
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Filed under: off topic classics 
August 30, 2014
My non-profit organization for promoting sustainable culture

gay-forest-spirit-liberation:

Living Earth Ark Food Forestries
Our ultimate goal is to spread the knowledge and culture of sustainability to the Northwest Arkansas area and beyond, thus preserving our natural resources and environment. Nature is designed to produce endless fertility and if we learn to tap into nature’s…

Followers, if any of you are in the Arkansas-Missouri-Kansas-Oklahoma region you should check out the work Mr. Zinck is doing. Even if not in that biome, you might find it inspirational.

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Filed under: living earth ark 
August 29, 2014
Building-Integrated Agriculture Revisited

agritecture:

We have been reviewing our Building-Integrated Agriculture (BIA) tagged blog posts today and re-learning about the many possible benefits of integrating agriculture into the urban environment. BIA concepts present very interesting strategies towards the development of sustainable, regenerative,… (click on the headline to go to agritecture complete post, and links to the featured piece.)

August 28, 2014
Tax Benefit May Not Return This Year - Farm Futures

August 27, 2014
o-eheu:

ambisagrus:

no image has ever described my life quite so well


"Nobis est desinere edere!" clamavit Bufo inter alium cenandum.

-Beniaminus

o-eheu:

ambisagrus:

no image has ever described my life quite so well

"Nobis est desinere edere!" clamavit Bufo inter alium cenandum.

-Beniaminus

(via life-of-a-latin-student)

August 26, 2014
A friend posted this on Facebook. I don’t believe that she was the author, but whoever was captured the memories of thousands…
__________________________
The History of ‘APRONS’ I don’t think our kids know what an apron is. The principle use of Grandma’s apron was to protect the dress underneath because she only had a few. It was also because it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and aprons used less material. But along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven.It was wonderful for drying children’s tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears. From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven. When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids..And when the weather was cold, Grandma wrapped it around her arms.Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove. Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron.From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables. After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls. In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees. When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds. When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the men folk knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that ‘old-time apron’ that served so many purposes. Send this to those who would know (and love) the story about Grandma’s aprons.REMEMBER: Grandma used to set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool. Her granddaughters set theirs on the window sill to thaw.They would go crazy now trying to figure out how many germs were on that apron.I don’t think I ever caught anything from an apron - but love…

A friend posted this on Facebook. I don’t believe that she was the author, but whoever was captured the memories of thousands…

__________________________

The History of ‘APRONS’ 

I don’t think our kids know what an apron is. The principle use of Grandma’s apron was to protect the dress underneath because she only had a few. It was also because it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and aprons used less material. But along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven.

It was wonderful for drying children’s tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears. 

From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven. 

When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids..

And when the weather was cold, Grandma wrapped it around her arms.

Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove. 

Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron.

From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables. After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls. 

In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees. 

When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds. 

When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the men folk knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.

It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that ‘old-time apron’ that served so many purposes. 

Send this to those who would know (and love) the story about Grandma’s aprons.

REMEMBER: 

Grandma used to set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool. Her granddaughters set theirs on the window sill to thaw.

They would go crazy now trying to figure out how many germs were on that apron.

I don’t think I ever caught anything from an apron - but love…

August 25, 2014
krippner:

(via Swedes celebrate first day of smelly fish season - The Local)
Yes, friends, it’s Surströmmingspremiär time again! Get out the gas masks, hide the children, because it’s the third Thursday of August and it’s Surströmmingspremiär season again.
Surströmmingspremiär is fermented herring, a ‘food’ so gut wrenching, so foul, so horrifying, that it’s banned from airplanes, most apartment buildings, and in at least one case smelled so bad that the authorities sent out emergency services because people thought it was a gas leak.
Herring is caught in spring, packed into barrels with salt, and then moved out under the summer sun. For months.
The resulting ‘food’ is packed in cans, which start to bulge so badly that in some cases they’ve been known to explode, and according to the article the best way to open the cans is underwater so you can’t smell it.
This stuff makes lutefisk (cod soaked in lye) seem downright pleasant by comparison.
Especially entertaining is the first video in the article. I won’t spoil the fun.


Don’t expect to see this on the IKEA herring bar anytime soon.

krippner:

(via Swedes celebrate first day of smelly fish season - The Local)

Yes, friends, it’s Surströmmingspremiär time again! Get out the gas masks, hide the children, because it’s the third Thursday of August and it’s Surströmmingspremiär season again.

Surströmmingspremiär is fermented herring, a ‘food’ so gut wrenching, so foul, so horrifying, that it’s banned from airplanes, most apartment buildings, and in at least one case smelled so bad that the authorities sent out emergency services because people thought it was a gas leak.

Herring is caught in spring, packed into barrels with salt, and then moved out under the summer sun. For months.

The resulting ‘food’ is packed in cans, which start to bulge so badly that in some cases they’ve been known to explode, and according to the article the best way to open the cans is underwater so you can’t smell it.

This stuff makes lutefisk (cod soaked in lye) seem downright pleasant by comparison.

Especially entertaining is the first video in the article. I won’t spoil the fun.

Don’t expect to see this on the IKEA herring bar anytime soon.

August 24, 2014

(photo courtesy of Nat’l Agricultural Library)

STUDY: Rural Montana Depends on Food Stamps

1.5 minute newsclip of a study by Jon Bailey of the Center for Rural Affairs. (And the first audio I’ve posted to Tumblr.)

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