August 20, 2014
Lard Makes A Come Back

krippner:

image

Yes, friends, lard, along with butter, is making a comeback. People have started to realize that it’s demonization was following WWII was just plain wrong. Lard is, probably, no worse for you than any other fat, and better for you than a lot of others, like transfats, hydrogenated fats, etc. It’s even becoming fashionable, as pointed out in this item over at Modern Farmer.

Do, indeed, check out the Modern Farmer article. I’m making note of the Elizabeth Swenson Artisan Lard Cookbook. The article also includes a recipe for smalec, the Polish-Slovak-Ruthenian spread. The Hungarians add paprika and call it zsir. If you like schmaltz (and aren’t Jewish or Muslim) it is a great asset for keeping somewhat sober while celebrating. 

Also, apple pie and snickerdoodle season is coming up quickly. Nothing makes a flakier crust or more savory crumb than old-fashioned lard.

August 17, 2014

sashayed:

acceber74:

nhaneh:

bored-no-more:

Ultimate proof that cats are smart !!! more smart cats«

Cat intelligence is actually a pretty interesting topic in that the majority of studies on the subject basically have to end in the conclusion "we just don’t know" because cats are among the most uncooperative research subjects of all time. We know a great deal of cat sight, having used cats as the archetype for a vision-focused vertebrate/mammal, but we still know very little about what really goes on inside the cat mind.

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#notallcats

(via 1909vintage)

August 16, 2014
The morning markets...

krippner:

image

Despite the experts claiming earlier this summer that prices were going to go in the tank, they’ve remained stubbornly solid. They’ve remained stable in the face of reports of record crops, trouble in Ukraine, trouble in Egypt, trouble in the mid-east… Prices have been moving a few cents up…

The weather will never be quite right. ;-)

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Filed under: commodities 
August 15, 2014
kohenari:

The course in question is called “Ancient Political Theory: Justice and the Good Life.” And you can take the course … kind of.
In place of traditional writing assignments, we will have an on-going blogging project for our course. The idea, in keeping with the subject matter, is for the class to create a sort of on-going virtual symposium. Here are the writing guidelines I’ll be giving to the students on the first day:
Argumentative Texts should be a minimum of 500 words on a topic related to our course readings.  All of these posts will be evaluated for the quality of writing and argumentation, and your ability to prompt (thoughtful) comments from other students will count as a positive.  Students will be expected to write a minimum of one such post every other week.  Each such post must be tagged #pols383.
If you think that something you’ve seen online resonates with our discussions, then you might write a Heroism, Justice, and the Good Life in the News post about it.  This should be a short post of approximately 100 words and should include a hyperlink to the original story, post, or item that you read.  These posts should do more than describe; they should explain and analyze.  Students will write a minimum of two such posts each week.
Commentary on other students’ posts will count as a form of writing in this course; you may comment as often or as infrequently as you choose.  Standards of civility, quality of argumentation, and writing apply.
So, basically, you can follow the class blog here on Tumblr and you can follow the #pols383 hashtag; you’ll start seeing posts there in about three weeks, I’d guess. You can even do the readings along with the students, if you’d like.
I certainly hope you’ll engage them in discussion of what they write; the reasons for this blogging assignment are to teach students how to write for a broader audience than just the professor, to encourage them to revise and respond to their audience, and to demonstrate to them the many ways in which the themes of our course find expression in political life today.
They’ll be hearing from me and from one another about their posts, but hearing from all of you with some regularity would definitely confirm what I tell them, namely that political theory is a living field of study rather than something only written by dead philosophers or for a professor to assign a grade.

Among my most common tags are “agricultural politics,” “agricultural economics,” and “food politics.” It would be meaningless to comment on any of these without a grounding in political theory.
Professor Kohen teaches at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. (Full disclosure: my alma mater albeit many years ago.) We are privileged to enjoy this technology to learn, or refresh our knowledge of, political theory. 

kohenari:

The course in question is called “Ancient Political Theory: Justice and the Good Life.” And you can take the course … kind of.

In place of traditional writing assignments, we will have an on-going blogging project for our course. The idea, in keeping with the subject matter, is for the class to create a sort of on-going virtual symposium. Here are the writing guidelines I’ll be giving to the students on the first day:

  1. Argumentative Texts should be a minimum of 500 words on a topic related to our course readings.  All of these posts will be evaluated for the quality of writing and argumentation, and your ability to prompt (thoughtful) comments from other students will count as a positive.  Students will be expected to write a minimum of one such post every other week.  Each such post must be tagged #pols383.
  2. If you think that something you’ve seen online resonates with our discussions, then you might write a Heroism, Justice, and the Good Life in the News post about it.  This should be a short post of approximately 100 words and should include a hyperlink to the original story, post, or item that you read.  These posts should do more than describe; they should explain and analyze.  Students will write a minimum of two such posts each week.
  3. Commentary on other students’ posts will count as a form of writing in this course; you may comment as often or as infrequently as you choose.  Standards of civility, quality of argumentation, and writing apply.

So, basically, you can follow the class blog here on Tumblr and you can follow the #pols383 hashtag; you’ll start seeing posts there in about three weeks, I’d guess. You can even do the readings along with the students, if you’d like.

I certainly hope you’ll engage them in discussion of what they write; the reasons for this blogging assignment are to teach students how to write for a broader audience than just the professor, to encourage them to revise and respond to their audience, and to demonstrate to them the many ways in which the themes of our course find expression in political life today.

They’ll be hearing from me and from one another about their posts, but hearing from all of you with some regularity would definitely confirm what I tell them, namely that political theory is a living field of study rather than something only written by dead philosophers or for a professor to assign a grade.

Among my most common tags are “agricultural politics,” “agricultural economics,” and “food politics.” It would be meaningless to comment on any of these without a grounding in political theory.

Professor Kohen teaches at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. (Full disclosure: my alma mater albeit many years ago.) We are privileged to enjoy this technology to learn, or refresh our knowledge of, political theory. 

August 14, 2014
jtotheizzoe:

chels:

A fish slingshot for helping our finned friends get over dams is now being tested in the wild: 

"Originally designed for fruit, Whooshh turned its technology into a tool to help safely send fish over dams blocking the course on the Columbia river in Washington state. Under tests right now with the Department of Energy and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Whooshh tubes could be shooting more fish over dams in the near future. A test this past summer showed that fish will voluntarily enter the tube. When they swim into the entrance, the vacuum sucks them in and gives them initial boost; after that, elevated pressure behind the fish keeps them moving at about 15 to 22 miles per hour till they go flying out the other end."

You can watch a whole video about how this crazy fish cannon works, or read more about it here. 
(Via Alexis Madrigal’s 5 Intriguing Things newsletter)

We are mighty.

Wet Wednesday. The mind boggles.

jtotheizzoe:

chels:

A fish slingshot for helping our finned friends get over dams is now being tested in the wild: 

"Originally designed for fruit, Whooshh turned its technology into a tool to help safely send fish over dams blocking the course on the Columbia river in Washington state. Under tests right now with the Department of Energy and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Whooshh tubes could be shooting more fish over dams in the near future. A test this past summer showed that fish will voluntarily enter the tube. When they swim into the entrance, the vacuum sucks them in and gives them initial boost; after that, elevated pressure behind the fish keeps them moving at about 15 to 22 miles per hour till they go flying out the other end."

You can watch a whole video about how this crazy fish cannon works, or read more about it here

(Via Alexis Madrigal’s 5 Intriguing Things newsletter)

We are mighty.

Wet Wednesday. The mind boggles.

August 13, 2014
rhamphotheca:

Yellowstone National Park - WY, USA
Have you seen wolf lichen (Letharia vulpina), one of many lichens growing on living and dead trees throughout the park? 
The toxic pigment vulpinic acid gives it a bright yellow-green color. Lichens are composed of a fungus that provides structural support and an alga that produces food via photosynthesis. Some lichens grow on trees, but they are self-sufficient and do not harm the trees (epiphytic). 
Photo courtesy of Curtis Akin

I will always reblog information about lichens. Of course, that isn’t a great burden in the Tumblrverse.

rhamphotheca:

Have you seen wolf lichen (Letharia vulpina), one of many lichens growing on living and dead trees throughout the park?

The toxic pigment vulpinic acid gives it a bright yellow-green color. Lichens are composed of a fungus that provides structural support and an alga that produces food via photosynthesis. Some lichens grow on trees, but they are self-sufficient and do not harm the trees (epiphytic).

Photo courtesy of Curtis Akin

I will always reblog information about lichens. Of course, that isn’t a great burden in the Tumblrverse.

(via foodsexandnature)

August 12, 2014
Russia bans food imports from U.S., E.U.

At least as a few years ago, Russia was our single largest importer of U.S. grown chicken legs. This was always a mystery to me. Admittedly, I’ve not spent time in Russia but I have read as many Russian cookbooks as I can get my hands on. Chicken legs aren’t a key ingredient in any Russian recipe of which I’m aware.

What are/were they doing with all those chicken legs?

(Source: Washington Post)

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Filed under: chicken legs 
August 12, 2014

pol102:

odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims

1Criminalizing Blackness in America

2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares

3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death

4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)

This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe

Disturbing. But not surprising.

Off topic, but too important to ignore.

And it is not as far off topic as you may think. When you picture an American farmer, most people picture a white man. Some areas, maybe latino, but usually white. Well, that makes a certain sense. Most American farmers are white. (Not speculation. The 2007 agricultural census data is here.)

And it’s not just the number of farmers. Look at the disparity in farm size.

Disparities like these don’t just happen. There was a much higher percentage of Asian, primarily Japanese, farmers in the West— until the internments of WW II. Their land was purchased at substantial discount by white investors.

The story of black farmers is still being felt, or at least it was as of last summer. If you’re not familiar with the history, or with the landmark case Pigford v. Glickman,  a quick synopsis, and careful analysis of the legal consequences, can be found in Cowan and Feder’s excellent piece for the Congressional Research Service. 

August 11, 2014
do-not-touch-my-food:

Caramelized Onion, Goat Cheese, and Prosciutto Pizza

Going on the menu for mid August. It’s a bumper crop this year. 

do-not-touch-my-food:

Caramelized Onion, Goat Cheese, and Prosciutto Pizza

Going on the menu for mid August. It’s a bumper crop this year. 

(via foodsexandnature)

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Filed under: figs 
August 11, 2014
Ruling on FDA's Oversight of Animal Antibiotic Use Called a 'Big Blow to Public Health' | Food Safety News

"If the law supposes that, the law is an ass!" - Mr. Bumble in Oliver Twist

And it proved itself so once again when the 2nd Circuit held that…..

 Natural Resources Defense Council Inc et al v. FDA et al, 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, Nos. 12-2106, 12-3607.

 

 

http://www.agandfoodlaw.com/search/label/Animal%20Feeding%20Operations

 

http://dirtdoll.tumblr.com/

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