September 30, 2014
University relations a must for ag

agrithoughts:

Study finds messages and viewpoints being conveyed on college campuses were often misleading and, in some cases, very anti-agriculture motivated.

If we can’t create a positive medium within the university system, I don’t think we can create one amongst a large scale consumer group.


The story covers a study conducted in Missouri of intra-scholastic communication and attitudes about agriculture. I’d like to know more about the study itself before commenting. Too often, reports discovering biases often have biases in their own designs. Even so, I’ve long been disheartened at the increasingly marginalized role agriculture and engineering play in humanities and social sciences at our land-grant institutions.

September 29, 2014
Apple Cider Making Webinar!

Sign up for this! Sadly, work gets in the way of so much that I want to do.

(Source: dirtdoll)

1:00am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZKkDTy1RxhClE
  
Filed under: cider 
September 27, 2014

On those luminous (summer) mornings Adela returned from the market, like Pomona emerging from the flames of the day, spilling from her basket the colorful beauty of the sun—the shiny pink cherries full of juice under their transparent skins, the mysterious black morellos that smelled so much better than they tasted; apricots in whose golden pulp lay the core of long afternoons. And next to that pure poetry of fruit, she unloaded sides of meat with their keyboard of ribs swollen with energy and strength, and seaweeds of vegetables like dead octopuses and squids—the raw material of meals with a yet undefined taste, the vegetative and terrestrial ingredients of dinner, exuding a wild and rustic smell.  (from The Street of Crocodiles by Bruno Schulz (1892-1922). Trans by Celina Wieniewska)

Image is a self-portrait of Schulz.

September 26, 2014
Lithuania Feels Squeeze in Sanctions War With Russia

In the sanctions war between Russia and the West, Kasia Jankun’s 80 dairy cows seem to be losing.

The sanctions, which are taking a toll on Russia’s economy, cut both ways. And Ms. Jankun and other small farmers in this Baltic nation of three million people are bearing an overwhelming share of the pain from a Russian ban on European dairy products.

Former Soviet bloc countries that, like Lithuania, are part of the European Union and the NATO military alliance might seem safe from the Russian strong-arming that made Ukraine so vulnerable. But in economic standoffs, it is often the most vulnerable that suffer most.

The loss of the Russian market created an oversupply of milk, which pushed prices in Europe well below the break-even point for farmers like Ms. Jankun, whose 250-acre farm in eastern Lithuania lies at the end of a dirt road in rolling country dappled by groves of pine and alder.

“If nothing changes by spring, at these prices, it’s bankruptcy, ” Ms. Jankun, 50, said recently, as she served visitors thick slices of homemade cheese that she sells at outdoor markets to make up for lost income.

Access the complete NY Times featurette by clicking the headline. It is an excellent case study of the problems faced by small farmers in a small nation, and is accompanied by excellent slides of the Lithuanian dairy industry.

I was delighted to discover the tumblog fyeaheasterneurope a few weeks back. (I took a Russian and East European Area Studies minor as an undergrad, and continued the studies in comparative econ and politics in grad school).

(Illustration “Cows Grazing in Early Autumn” attributed to Lithuanian-Israeli artist Moshe Rosenthalis, 1922-2008. from http://auctions.bidsquare.com/view-auctions/catalog/id/64/lot/50453/ on 9/24/14)

September 25, 2014
compoundchem:

This graphic takes a look at the science behind jam-making, and how it sets. More detail in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-wk

So having reblogged this wonderful graphic on jam making, I’m going to make an abashed commercial endorsement. 
I’m a jam maker. It’s just one of the many wonderful ways to live core principles of microeconomics - in this case by adding value to a lower value commodity. I planted the fruit trees, vines and bushes, harvest the crop, and then convert the crop to a still higher value by turning it into jam, and higher value yet by turning the jam into charitable contributions or personal gifts. 
To accomplish this, I use products from pacificpectin.com . 
                         
Great product line, reasonable package sizes (10 lbs.), wonderful tech support. And no, this isn’t a paid advertisement. Just passing on an endorsement of a company I learned about from other local jam makers and with which I have been very happy.

compoundchem:

This graphic takes a look at the science behind jam-making, and how it sets. More detail in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-wk

So having reblogged this wonderful graphic on jam making, I’m going to make an abashed commercial endorsement. 

I’m a jam maker. It’s just one of the many wonderful ways to live core principles of microeconomics - in this case by adding value to a lower value commodity. I planted the fruit trees, vines and bushes, harvest the crop, and then convert the crop to a still higher value by turning it into jam, and higher value yet by turning the jam into charitable contributions or personal gifts. 

To accomplish this, I use products from pacificpectin.com

                         

Great product line, reasonable package sizes (10 lbs.), wonderful tech support. And no, this isn’t a paid advertisement. Just passing on an endorsement of a company I learned about from other local jam makers and with which I have been very happy.

(via eatgeekstudy)

September 24, 2014
Fermentation Farm - Modern Farmer

Pictured: Sandor Katz, Fermentation Evangelist

Pictured: Sandor Katz, Fermentation Evangelist

9:17pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZKkDTy1Rd0td2
Filed under: fermentation 
September 23, 2014
Moldova Socialists Irate Over Romanian PM's 'Unification' Statement

Moldova’s opposition Socialist Party has said it is “deeply outraged” by Romanian Prime Minister Victor Ponta’s statement about his intention to pursue the reunification of Romania with Moldova.

Ponta, who is the ruling Social Democrats’ presidential candidate and the favorite to win the November election, told a campaign rally last week that a “second great unification of Romania” should be accomplished by 2018.

The first unification occurred in 1918, when most of present-day Moldova became part of Romania alongside Transylvania and other territories.

The pro-Moscow Moldovan Socialists said in a statement that Ponta “has thrown off the moderate politician’s mask”

It said his remarks demonstrated that all Romanian politicians have the same objective: “To destroy and take over Moldova.”

Off Topic: I only wondered why its taken this long. I expected Romania to pursue this within five years of the fall of the Soviet Union. 

(Source: fyeaheasterneurope)

September 22, 2014
unconsumption:


UK supermarket giant Sainsbury’s has now created the first outlet in the country to be powered solely through food waste.
Collaborating with waste recycling company Biffa, the company has developed a facility close to its Cannock, West Midlands store that has enabled it to leave the grid completely. Like many other supermarkets, the outlet marks down any fruit and vegetable products at the end of the day if they’re no longer good to sell.
However, if they’re still not sold they’re handed over to charitable organizations that can still use it, or used to create animal feed. If it’s not suitable for any of that, the food waste is picked up from a nearby Sainsbury’s depot by Biffa, which uses its anaerobic digestion facility to turn the waste into electricity. A 1.5km cable is then used to send the energy — enough to power day-to-day operation of a store — back to the Cannock outlet.

(via Supermarket store is entirely powered by food waste | Springwise)

unconsumption:

UK supermarket giant Sainsbury’s has now created the first outlet in the country to be powered solely through food waste.

Collaborating with waste recycling company Biffa, the company has developed a facility close to its Cannock, West Midlands store that has enabled it to leave the grid completely. Like many other supermarkets, the outlet marks down any fruit and vegetable products at the end of the day if they’re no longer good to sell.

However, if they’re still not sold they’re handed over to charitable organizations that can still use it, or used to create animal feed. If it’s not suitable for any of that, the food waste is picked up from a nearby Sainsbury’s depot by Biffa, which uses its anaerobic digestion facility to turn the waste into electricity. A 1.5km cable is then used to send the energy — enough to power day-to-day operation of a store — back to the Cannock outlet.

(via Supermarket store is entirely powered by food waste | Springwise)

September 21, 2014
Another really bad farmer joke (egads, I hope this isn’t a trend)

krippner:

Farmer to new hired hand: “Now, are you sure you know how long cows should be milked?”

"Sure. The same amount of time as the short ones."

Ayup.

September 19, 2014
mollyfamous:

did-you-kno:

Scientists have found a way to “switch off” autoimmune diseases by converting cells that attack healthy tissue into cells that protect against disease. This incredible breakthrough has the potential to save the lives of millions of people. Source

This is incredibly exciting!

Yowza! If true, this is exciting! (Disclosure - I’ve been in remission for seven years.)

mollyfamous:

did-you-kno:

Scientists have found a way to “switch off” autoimmune diseases by converting cells that attack healthy tissue into cells that protect against disease. This incredible breakthrough has the potential to save the lives of millions of people. Source

This is incredibly exciting!

Yowza! If true, this is exciting! (Disclosure - I’ve been in remission for seven years.)

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