June 16, 2013
If accurate, this is truly big news. Disclosure: I have a personal stake in this.
the-science-llama:

The Root Cause of Diabetes Has Been Identified
A quote from the article

Fiorina and his team studied hundreds of pathways in animals with diabetes. They eventually isolated one, known as ATP/P2X7R, which triggers the T-cell attacks on the pancreas, rendering it unable to produce insulin.“By identifying the ATP/P2X7R pathway as the early mechanism in the body that fires up an alloimmune response, we found the root cause of diabetes,” says Fiorina. “With the cause identified, we can now focus on treatment options. Everything from drug therapies to transplants that require less immunosuppression is being explored.”

If accurate, this is truly big news. Disclosure: I have a personal stake in this.

the-science-llama:

The Root Cause of Diabetes Has Been Identified

A quote from the article

Fiorina and his team studied hundreds of pathways in animals with diabetes. They eventually isolated one, known as ATP/P2X7R, which triggers the T-cell attacks on the pancreas, rendering it unable to produce insulin.

“By identifying the ATP/P2X7R pathway as the early mechanism in the body that fires up an alloimmune response, we found the root cause of diabetes,” says Fiorina. “With the cause identified, we can now focus on treatment options. Everything from drug therapies to transplants that require less immunosuppression is being explored.”

(via eatgeekstudy)

April 16, 2013
What an incredible discovery for its time!
laboratoryequipment:

Today in Lab History: April 15, 1923- Insulin becomes availableIn 1923, insulin became generally available for diabetics’ use. It was first discovered in 1922. Today, insulin, is used daily in the treatment of diabetes.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history

What an incredible discovery for its time!

laboratoryequipment:

Today in Lab History: April 15, 1923- Insulin becomes available

In 1923, insulin became generally available for diabetics’ use. It was first discovered in 1922. Today, insulin, is used daily in the treatment of diabetes.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history

(via eatgeekstudy)

10:53pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZKkDTyitzY6J
  
Filed under: insulin digestion 
January 10, 2013
Gut instincts: The secrets of your second brain

I attend to post  / repost more this year on digestion and its products. This is a great start - much more interesting than my colonoscopy. Also, this is the first time I’ve ever seen the word “stodge” used. That alone earns a repost.

neurosneurosciencestuff:

When it comes to your moods, decisions and behaviour, the brain in your head is not the only one doing the thinking

image

IT’S been a tough morning. You were late for work, missed a crucial meeting and now your boss is mad at you. Come lunchtime you walk straight past the salad bar and head for the stodge. You can’t help yourself - at times of stress the brain encourages us to seek out comfort foods. That much is well known. What you probably don’t know, though, is that the real culprit may not be the brain in your skull but your other brain.

Yes, that’s right, your other brain. Your body contains a separate nervous system that is so complex it has been dubbed the second brain. It comprises an estimated 500 million neurons - about five times as many as in the brain of a rat - and is around 9 metres long, stretching from your oesophagus to your anus. It is this brain that could be responsible for your craving under stress for crisps, chocolate and cookies.

Read More

October 31, 2012
Crusty foods may worsen heart problems associated with diabetes

“URBANA – A University of Illinois study suggests avoiding cooking methods that produce the kind of crusty bits you’d find on a grilled hamburger, especially if you have diabetes and know you’re at increased risk for cardiovascular disease because of your diagnosis.
“We see evidence that cooking methods that create a crust—think the edge of a brownie or the crispy borders of meats prepared at very high temperatures—produce advanced glycation end products (AGEs). And AGEs are associated with plaque formation, the kind we see in cardiovascular disease,” said Karen Chapman-Novakofski, a U of I professor of nutrition.”
Ah, hell. Full Disclosure: Meadowslark is diabetic. And grumpy.
Click the photo of the lovely end cut of prime rib to go to the article. The photo was found through Google images and is allegedly of the dish served at Louie’s on the Avenue in Pearl River, New York. 

Crusty foods may worsen heart problems associated with diabetes

URBANA – A University of Illinois study suggests avoiding cooking methods that produce the kind of crusty bits you’d find on a grilled hamburger, especially if you have diabetes and know you’re at increased risk for cardiovascular disease because of your diagnosis.


“We see evidence that cooking methods that create a crust—think the edge of a brownie or the crispy borders of meats prepared at very high temperatures—produce advanced glycation end products (AGEs). And AGEs are associated with plaque formation, the kind we see in cardiovascular disease,” said Karen Chapman-Novakofski, a U of I professor of nutrition.”

Ah, hell. Full Disclosure: Meadowslark is diabetic. And grumpy.

Click the photo of the lovely end cut of prime rib to go to the article. The photo was found through Google images and is allegedly of the dish served at Louie’s on the Avenue in Pearl River, New York. 

August 7, 2012
Like biology but not sure what you want to do for your advanced work? Hint… (Clicking the photo carries you to the article in the NY Times.)
datanouveau:

Where are the microbes? Researchers mapped helpful bacteria in several areas in the body and by phylum and genus. The diagram, which appears to be created in Circos, shows the frequency of various bacteria in each part of the body, the family tree of the microbes, and the overall prevalence—at least a dozen dimensions. The most frequent appears to be propionibacterium acnes, linked to the development of acne.

Like biology but not sure what you want to do for your advanced work? Hint… (Clicking the photo carries you to the article in the NY Times.)

datanouveau:

Where are the microbes? Researchers mapped helpful bacteria in several areas in the body and by phylum and genus. The diagram, which appears to be created in Circos, shows the frequency of various bacteria in each part of the body, the family tree of the microbes, and the overall prevalence—at least a dozen dimensions. The most frequent appears to be propionibacterium acnes, linked to the development of acne.

(via sunfoundation)

April 8, 2012
mental_floss on tumblr: The Drunken Uncles of the Rodent World

Well, it sort of relates to digestion.

mentalflossr:

Syrian golden hamsters are—to put it mildly—the drunken uncles of the rodent world. In the wild, these hard-partying hamsters spend their summers gathering and storing fruit as a survival measure. By winter, when they need to break into the stash, the fruit has fermented. Over time, the…

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »