May 17, 2012
This is so wrong. So very, very wrong. Are there any criminal justice or rural sociology students who follow this Tumblog? If so, perhaps you can help us answer these questions: 1.) Are our rural sheriff’s offices and county prosecutors equipped to address these problems, even if complaints were made? And 2.) Are there social or other restraints keeping rural criminal justice agencies from doing their jobs?

humanrightswatch:

The US must stop sexual violence against immigrant farmworkers.
Hundreds of thousands of immigrant farmworker women and girls in the United States face a high risk of sexual violence and sexual harassment in their workplaces because US authorities and employers fail to protect them adequately.
In a new 95-page report, Human Rights Watch documents rape, stalking, unwanted touching, exhibitionism, or vulgar and obscene language by supervisors, employers, and others in positions of power. Most farmworkers interviewed said they had experienced such treatment or knew others who had. And most said they had not reported these or other workplace abuses, fearing reprisals. Those who had filed sexual harassment claims or reported sexual assault to the police had done so with the encouragement and assistance of survivor advocates or attorneys in the face of difficult challenges.
Farmworkers described experiences such as the following: (click photo to continue reading…)

This is so wrong. So very, very wrong. Are there any criminal justice or rural sociology students who follow this Tumblog? If so, perhaps you can help us answer these questions: 1.) Are our rural sheriff’s offices and county prosecutors equipped to address these problems, even if complaints were made? And 2.) Are there social or other restraints keeping rural criminal justice agencies from doing their jobs?

humanrightswatch:

The US must stop sexual violence against immigrant farmworkers.

Hundreds of thousands of immigrant farmworker women and girls in the United States face a high risk of sexual violence and sexual harassment in their workplaces because US authorities and employers fail to protect them adequately.

In a new 95-page report, Human Rights Watch documents rape, stalking, unwanted touching, exhibitionism, or vulgar and obscene language by supervisors, employers, and others in positions of power. Most farmworkers interviewed said they had experienced such treatment or knew others who had. And most said they had not reported these or other workplace abuses, fearing reprisals. Those who had filed sexual harassment claims or reported sexual assault to the police had done so with the encouragement and assistance of survivor advocates or attorneys in the face of difficult challenges.

Farmworkers described experiences such as the following: (click photo to continue reading…)

(via theatlantic)

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