August 2, 2012
The Story of Grant Wood’s American Gothic, and How It Ruined His Life

A marvelous short essay on Grant Wood and his American Gothic by Elizabeth Lunday. I think I’ll do a weeklong series this fall on Art/Illustration in agriculture. 

mentalflossr:

While American Gothic is as recognizable as the Mona Lisa, few people know the story of Grant Wood and how the piece unraveled his life.

July 17, 2012
"

Corn sex is complicated. As Michael Pollan observes in “The Omnivore’s Dilemma,” the whole affair is so freakishly difficult it’s hard to imagine how it ever evolved in the first place. Corn’s female organs are sheathed in a sort of vegetable chastity belt—surrounded by a tough, virtually impenetrable husk. The only way in is by means of a silk thread that each flower extends, Rapunzel-like, through a small opening. For fertilization to take place, a grain of pollen must land on the tip of the silk, then shimmy its way six to eight inches through a microscopic tube, a journey that requires several hours. The result of a successfully completed passage is a single kernel. When everything is going well, the process is repeated something like eight hundred times per ear, or roughly eighty thousand times per bushel.

It is now corn-sex season across the Midwest, and everything is not going well.

"

Opening to “The Big Heat” by Elizabeth Kolbert in the New Yorker. Chilling (no pun intended). Scary. Necessary. It’s short. Read it.  (via changetheratio)

This is a lede.

(via motherjones)Zea mays

(via motherjones)

July 3, 2012
bey0-nd:

so-wrong—its-right:

“Lightning” My front yard 5/15/2012 by Michigan Nut on Flickr.

bey0-nd:

so-wrong—its-right:

“Lightning” My front yard 5/15/2012 by Michigan Nut on Flickr.

(Source: aestheticmichigan, via shemaysurpriseyou-deactivated20)

11:55am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZKkDTyOdetzC
  
Filed under: midwest 
June 22, 2012
What a writing prompt! Does anyone know who the photographer is, or who holds the copyright?
heartdeeperthanthebrand:

I was that little girl who didn’t wear a shirt and who wore bibs all the timegrowing up :)

What a writing prompt! Does anyone know who the photographer is, or who holds the copyright?

heartdeeperthanthebrand:

I was that little girl who didn’t wear a shirt and who wore bibs all the timegrowing up :)

(Source: extremelybeautiful.me)

February 8, 2012
Wet Wednesday. Or not so wet in this case. The most recent drought monitor map for the United States indicates that the northern and southern droughts are only separated by about 175 miles. As bad as that is, it represents an improvement over November 2011. 
Clicking the picture will lead you to links that help understand the drought, prediction methodologies, and the impacts of drought. 

Wet Wednesday. Or not so wet in this case. The most recent drought monitor map for the United States indicates that the northern and southern droughts are only separated by about 175 miles. As bad as that is, it represents an improvement over November 2011. 

Clicking the picture will lead you to links that help understand the drought, prediction methodologies, and the impacts of drought. 

November 15, 2011
"A Sand County Almanac"

(image from Powells.com, the independent bookseller and Northwest landmark.)

notesformyfuturefarm:

“There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace. To avoid the first danger, one should plant a garden, preferably where there is no grocer to confuse the issue. To avoid the second, he should lay a split of good oak on the andirons, preferably where there is no furnace, and let it warm his shins while a February blizzard tosses the trees outside. If one has cut, split, hauled, and piled his own good oak, and let his mind work the while, he will remember much about where heat comes from, and with a wealth of detail denied to those who spend the weekend in town astride a radiator.”

Aldo Leopold (via amongflora-and-fauna)

Two sidenotes: 1) Seriously, bless you, Aldo. Bless this man. 2) If any of you have even the faintest interest in animals, natural history, the land, all the wonderful little things that happen on it, and how that relates to you and your ethical life, I have a strong feeling you’d love A Sand County Almanac (1949). 

(Source: thegreenliferi)

October 28, 2011
(photo by Ryan McGinnis/Getty Images)
“(T)he Rothko-like blocks of earth and sky…when you live underneath a sky that big, it’s hard to take yourself too seriously.”  —Meghan Daum, writing in the current issue of The Smithsonian about a New Yorker in Lincoln, Nebraska.
Want to know what we expats feel about home? Read the article AND the comments. Clicking on the picture will take you to the site.

(photo by Ryan McGinnis/Getty Images)

“(T)he Rothko-like blocks of earth and sky…when you live underneath a sky that big, it’s hard to take yourself too seriously.”  —Meghan Daum, writing in the current issue of The Smithsonian about a New Yorker in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Want to know what we expats feel about home? Read the article AND the comments. Clicking on the picture will take you to the site.

10:04am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZKkDTyBDS0Xy
  
Filed under: Nebraska midwest prairie 
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